Ray Lewis Net Worth & Biography

By Mixxerly Updated: SEPTEMBER 22, 2021

Introduction

NET WORTH

$50M

Ray Lewis is an American former professional football player who was a middle linebacker with the Baltimore Ravens for his entire 17-year career in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Miami Hurricanes and earned All-America honors.

Lewis was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and upon his retirement following the 2012 season, was the last remaining active player from the team's inaugural season.

He was named NFL Defensive Player of the Year and led the Ravens' record-setting defense to victory in Super Bowl XXXV.

Lewis also became the second linebacker to win the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award and the first to win the award on the winning Super Bowl team. Lewis won his second Defensive Player of the Year award in 2003, becoming the sixth player to win the award multiple times. As of , Ray Lewis has an estimated net worth of about $50M.

At a Glance

Full name: Raymond Anthony Lewis Jr.

Other names: Ray Lewis

Birthday: May 15, 1975

Age:

Net worth: $50M

Occupation: American Professional Football Player

Nationality: United States of America

Net Worth

Ray Lewis is one of the greatest NFL player in the history of American football. His tremendously successful career helped him make a personal fortune. Today he is among the richest athletes and wealthiest NFL players in the world. As of , Ray Lewis has an estimated net worth of about $50M.

Early Life

Ray Lewis was born in Bartow, Florida on May 15, 1975. He is the older brother of the former University of Maryland running back Keon Lattimore. Lewis was an All-American linebacker for the football team at Kathleen High School in Lakeland. In addition, he was a prolific wrestler for the school.

His father was absent most of his life, which was a cycle through generations, but he was a record-setting high school wrestler before he was incarcerated for drug-related offenses.

He revealed that his stepfather was extremely abusive towards his mother, and got a deck of 52 playing cards to start his push-up regimen, so he could get stronger to protect her. This also was the reason behind choosing the #52 jersey in his professional career.

Favorite Quotes from Ray Lewis

“You’ve got to go out and show them that I’m a different creature now, then I was five minutes ago, cause I’m pissed off for greatness. Cause if you ain’t pissed off for greatness, that just means you’re okay with being mediocre.” – Ray Lewis
“You’re carrying a legacy, You’re carrying greatness. And greatness is a lot of small things done well. Day after day. Workout after workout. Obedience after obedience.” – Ray Lewis
“If there’s something in your life that you know needs changing, make sure you change it before God’s got to change it. Because if God’s got to change it, you ain’t going to like it.” – Ray Lewis
“I ride my bicycle all the time. There’s one thing about my bicycle. I’m riding, I’m riding, I’m riding. And no matter how tired I start to get, it’s never about this pedal I’m pedaling, it’s about the next pedal, and if you can get to that next one, your bike will keep moving.” – Ray Lewis
“It has nothing to do with talent and everything to do with effort! Wins and losses come a dime a dozen. But an effort? Nobody can judge that. Because effort is between you and you.” – Ray Lewis

Career

Lewis enrolled in the University of Miami, where he was a member of the Miami Hurricanes football team. As a freshman, he was an immediate contributor and became a starter for the Hurricanes' final five games. He compiled 81 tackles, two sacks, two tackles for loss, and four pass deflections en route to being named to the freshman All-American team.

In his sophomore season, Lewis earned first-team All-American and All-Big East honors. Lewis led the Big East with 153 tackles and also contributed nine tackles for a loss, two sacks, and an interception for a Hurricanes team that had the nation's top-ranked defense and finished No. 6 in both the writers' and coaches' polls.

Lewis's junior campaign was even more successful, as he was again named to the All-American and All-Big East teams, and finished as runner-up for the Butkus Award, given to the top linebacker in college football. Lewis finished his junior season with 160 tackles, the second highest in University of Miami team history after Ed Weisacosky's 164 in 1965.

Lewis led the Big East in tackles his last two seasons and accumulated the fifth most in Miami history despite playing only three seasons.

After the 1995 season, Lewis decided to forgo his final year of college eligibility and enter the NFL draft. The Baltimore Ravens, who were entering their inaugural season, selected Lewis 26th overall in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft.

Lewis was the top-rated inside linebacker heading into the 1996 NFL Draft, in which Kevin Hardy was considered the draft's only outstanding linebacker prospect. Taken as the fifth linebacker in the draft, Lewis was seen by scouts as possessing speed, tackling ability, and intensity, but many considered his lack of size a potential liability.

In his first career game, a Week 1 19-14 victory over the Oakland Raiders, Lewis earned AFC Defensive Player of the Week for his seven-tackle, one-interception performance. Lewis earned USA Today's All-Rookie team honors after his 15 tackles for loss led the NFL and 110 tackles led the Ravens in the 1996 season.

He added two and a half sacks, six pass deflections, and an interception on the season.

In Week 9, against the Washington Redskins, Lewis earned his second AFC Defensive Player of the Week honor. Lewis recorded an NFL-best and career-high 184 tackles in 1997, which is unofficially the second-most ever in a season, and earned his first Pro Bowl berth at the end of that season.

In 1998, Lewis made his second trip to the Pro Bowl after recording 120 tackles, three sacks, two interceptions, a forced fumble, and seven pass deflections. He led the Ravens in tackles for the third consecutive season. He was also named to The Sporting News All-Pro Team.

In 1999, Lewis led the NFL in tackles with 168. He was named to a third-straight Pro Bowl and the All-Pro first team. He also totaled three and a half sacks, three interceptions, eight pass deflections, a safety, and a forced fumble. Lewis won the 1999 NFL Alumni Linebacker Of The Year chosen by past NFL players voting according to the position they played.

In 2000, Lewis led a defense which many call the greatest in NFL history for a single season. The team set a 16-game single-season record for fewest points allowed (165) and fewest rushing yards allowed (970). The team recorded four shutouts, one shy of the single-season record. The unit finished first league-wide in six key defensive categories.

In 2001, Lewis earned his fifth consecutive Pro Bowl selection, when he led the NFL in tackles with 162 and earned first-team All-Pro honors. In Week 15, he earned his third AFC Defensive Player of the Week honor in a 15–0 shutout of the Cincinnati Bengals.

In 2002, Lewis was limited to only five games due to a shoulder injury. He still managed to rank fifth on the team with 58 tackles. In addition, Lewis compiled two interceptions, two pass deflections, a forced fumble and a fumble recovery.

Lewis earned AFC Defensive Player of the Week honors in Week 4 against the Denver Broncos after posting 18 tackles (11 solo), two pass deflections, and an interception on Monday Night Football.

In 2011, Lewis was named to his 13th and what proved to be his final Pro Bowl, and led the Ravens with 95 tackles despite missing four games with an injury.

Lewis also collected two sacks, one interception, two forced fumbles, and seven pass deflections. Lewis totaled 20 tackles and one pass deflection in two playoff games.